NSO Summer Music Institute

(July 2-30, 2012)

Application Deadline: February 20, 2012

Through an initiative of the NSO National Trustees, young musicians ages 15-20 are eligible to apply for a National Trustees’ fellowship. One musician from most states will be selected to participate on scholarship in the 2012 Summer Music Institute. Several international students will be selected as well.

Program Description: The Kennedy Center/National Symphony Orchestra Summer Music Institute is a 4-week summer music program at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, DC, for student instrumentalists. The program is designed for serious music students. Each student accepted into the Program attends on full scholarship, which includes the following benefits: housing, food allowance, and local transportation during their stay in our Nation’s Capital. (Round-trip transportation to and from Washington, DC, is not included.)

  • Private lessons taught by a member of the National Symphony Orchestra
  • Chamber music coaching by NSO musicians
  • Master classes and seminars
  • Attendance at selected rehearsals and performances of the NSO
  • Participation in the NSO Summer Music Institute Orchestra, conducted by Elizabeth Schulze
  • Performance opportunities in DC metropolitan area
  • Exposure to internationally-renowned conductors, soloists, and musicians

Standards of Eligibility & Acceptance: The program is intended for serious music students, ages 15-20, who are considering orchestral music as a career and willing to devote themselves to a musical education, with the primary acceptance standard being musical talent. Ethnic minorities are encouraged to apply.

Obligation of Participants:
Seriousness and desire to pursue a musical education are most important. Students selected for a fellowship will be expected to enter into a contractual arrangement with the Kennedy Center/National Symphony Orchestra.

All private lesson fees and performance admittance charges will be paid for by the Kennedy Center/National Symphony Orchestra. Fees for any unexcused absences at lessons must be paid for by the student.

Instruments: National Trustees’ fellowships may be awarded to students who play any of the following: violin, viola, cello, string bass, flute, oboe, clarinet, bassoon, French horn, trumpet, trombone, tuba and harp.  Visit the Kennedy Center website for details on the required repertoire.

Financial Aid: A limited amount of financial aid to help defray transportation costs is available for those who demonstrate extreme financial need. To apply, complete the Financial Aid Application and mail by the deadline.  Students selected to participate in SMI will be notified of any financial aid in their acceptance letters.

To Apply:
NEW this season – All applicants will submit their applications online via ArtsApp.com (including solo and excerpts recordings) through the Kennedy Center website using ArtsApp – an independent company and is not affiliated with the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. There is a charge of $10 to use the ArtsApp site, which is a registration fee for the site itself and is collected through PayPal.

Please contact Carole Wysocki, NSO Director of Education, cjwysocki@kennedy-center.org for further information if you are unable to complete the online application process for any reason.

Available documents:

NSO Summer Music Institute flyer

The student fellowships are made possible by the NSO National Trustees.

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