Tag Archives: Multi-Disciplinary

Letter/Bound

Get your letterpress on! Use typographical elements to create visual representations inspired by works of art in the Frye galleries. Students learn basic nineteenth-century printing techniques such as ink mixing, typesetting, and relief printing and receive an introduction to typography and bookbinding. Once the rules are mastered, we break them: Students experiment with type using […]
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The Chambered Nautilus: Poetry From Art

Art inspires art. In this two-part poetry writing workshop, students first spend an evening observing and discussing works of art in the Frye galleries. Drawing on this viewing experience, students then delve into the poet’s world for a day, crafting poetry and studying ekphrasis, an ancient tradition of writing creatively about art. Students explore a […]
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Visual Biographies Rembrandt, Van Dyck, Gainsborough

Seattle Art Museum’s upcoming special exhibition Rembrandt, Van Dyck, Gainsborough: The Treasures of Kenwood House, London, merges personal stories with old master painting prowess. Inspired by this exhibition, this interactive, art-making educator workshop will focus on visual biographies and portraits. Participants will foster new writing techniques and work with an experienced portrait artist to create […]
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Introduction to Design Thinking

How can design be used to make great experiences that promote learning and cultivate lasting, positive change? Design thinking is an approach to problem solving that combines empathy and creativity to answer messy, world-sized problems through innovation and collaboration. Design is no longer “nice to have;” it’s now “must have” in fields including education, business, […]
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Galumpha

Galumpha combines acrobatics, visual effects, physical comedy and choreography to create a one-of-a-kind show that your students will talk about for weeks afterwards. The three actor/performers use their keen sense of balance to accomplish seemingly impossible physical feats. This show is as funny as it is awe-inspiring. The governing idea behind a Galumpha performance is […]
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Principals’ Professional Development: Race, School Climate, & the Arts

How do we meet state standards for teaching the arts if some cultural norms prevent students from participating? How come the makeup of some parent committees does not match the diversity of our student population? When these topics came up in the Principals’ Arts Leadership Program last year, we invited Arts Corps to join us […]
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Arts Integration Works!

Earlier this spring, Dayna Laur, an Advanced Placement Politics teacher, and Katlyn Wolfgang, an Art teacher, successfully integrated their two subjects in a cross-class collaboration project at Central York High School in Pennsylvania.  Ms. Laur introduced categories of public policy, which had to be fully researched by the politics students, who then presented their materials […]
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About Art: Wang Huaiqing

Hosting Organization: Seattle Art Museum Writing and the visual arts are natural partners in the classroom. This session of SAM’s annual Writing About Art Educator Workshop focuses on the work of contemporary Chinese painter Wang Huaiqing and explores how the visual arts can inspire both personal and political expression. Workshop participants will receive teaching materials, […]
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Educator Workshop: “Behind the Scenes:” Teaching from Popular Culture

Using the exhibition Behind the Scenes: The Real Story of the Quileute Wolves and the Twilight series as exemplars, this workshop will focus on how educators can use popular culture to make classroom instruction relevant to students. This interactive workshop will give educators an opportunity to learn from Quileute teens & elders as well as […]
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  • Random Posts

    • ArtsEd Washington Presents PAL Success at National Title I Conference

      Title I panel

      2014: At the National Title I Conference in San Diego in early February, ArtsEd Washington presented on using the arts to improve student and school success with a panel of principals who used ArtsEd Washington’s Principals Arts Leadership (PAL) program to transform their own Title I schools. The Title I program aims to bridge the achievement gap between low-income students and other students by providing supplemental federal funding to underachieving schools to meet the needs of at-risk students.

      Three principals shared their experiences working with the PAL program in Title I schools including Tracye Ferguson (formerly of Franklin Elementary and now Director of Title I/Early Learning for Tacoma Public Schools), Alan Matsumoto (Garfield Elementary in Yakima), and Farah Thaxton (formerly of Madrona K-8 in Seattle). ArtsEd Washington Executive Director Una McAlinden moderated the panel as they offered their leadership perspective and insights on how arts learning and specifically the PAL program has helped them improve their schools and can impact students and schools statewide. The session was introduced with pride by Gayle Pauley, Title I Director of Washington’s Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction.

      “Integrating arts education strategies in reading, mathematics, and the sciences is having a positive impact on the achievement of students who are struggling academically. Title I, Part A programs are demonstrating how this integration has a positive impact on student achievement,” said Pauley. “I am a musician myself and know first-hand the impact arts education has on student success.”

      Like many other schools across Washington State, Garfield, Madrona, and Franklin have used the PAL program to grow their arts capacities, impacting overall academic success, school culture, and student/family engagement. The panel shared their experiences in building effective arts plans, visions, and real world tactics to turn their schools into vibrant, successful places for their students to engage and learn. The session also covered tangible strategies to advance this instructional change and demonstrated a simple infrastructure for team-building, vision development, and planning for student success.

      “Including the arts in the school day improves student engagement, academic achievement, attendance, graduation rates, and overall success,” commented McAlinden. “The fact that our session was chosen for this national conference demonstrates the growing understanding among education leaders that the arts are a path to both student and school success.”

      The goal of the PAL program is to empower schools to create the fundamental systemic change that will ensure that the arts play a vital role in a complete education for all students, now and for years to come. PAL trains principals, as instructional leaders in all areas of curriculum, to expand their own capacities in arts leadership, to develop arts teams, visions, and plans, and to implement concrete strategies to integrate and sustain arts instruction for every student in every school.

      Thaxton’s experience at Madrona K-8, where more than three quarters of the students fall below the poverty line, demonstrated the remarkable impact of arts learning.  Citing more confident, engaged, and perseverant students at Madrona (which had limited arts offerings before she began work with the PAL program), Thaxton observes that the climate and culture of the school were transformed by the arts. She also sings the praises of the professional development she received through the program.

      Notes Thaxton, “It was one of the most focused professional development experiences I’ve had as a principal. PAL brought everybody’s voice together and was a key strategy in our success.”

      ArtsEd Washington is currently in the process of revamping the PAL program to be implemented at a district-wide level instead of the slower school-by-school approach. As part of the Creative Advantage, Seattle Public Schools has just begun implementation of PAL in its Central Pathway and will continue rollout to the whole district over the next few years.

      For more information, call 206-441-4501 or email office@artsedwashington.org